Category Archives: Would Drink Again

De Molen, Lentehop

Lentehop is an American style IPA, from a Dutch brouwerij (brewery) called De Molen. Like many great beers from that part of the world, it’s brewed in an old mill a mere 171 years older than Canada. Unlike many of those beers, it’s own history spans a little over a single decade. While it’s housings might give it instant credibility I’m inclined to criticize, brewers here in Canada should take note. Specifically Molson, who sold Molson House, a 50 year old fort near my house in Edmonton rather than making use of it in what would have easily been the most interesting place to drink in Alberta. But I digress.

Lentehop. It pours cloudy and golden, with a fairly substantial head. There is very little nose, just a hint of hops. I taste hops, certainly, but also some light citrus and pine. This IPA is surprisingly refreshing and fairly crisp.

I probably won’t go hunting specifically for it, but I would drink Lentehop from De Molen again.

 

Wychwood Hobgoblin

I bought this bottle because I thought the label was cool. C’mon, it has a goblin on it!

It poured out a nice ruby brown with a tan head of foam that dissipated quite quickly. This beer smells delicious, fruit, malt, toffee and later on, coffee. This beer went directly from my basement to a glass so it wasn’t chilled, allowing the flavours to really come through. I could really taste the caramel and it finished with a nice hoppy bitterness. This is a really rich, full beer.

I would definitely drink this one again!

 

De Prael’s Nick & Simon

De Prael draws on a long history of brewing, and grows their own hops in the yard behind the brewery. Their beer is often done in smaller batches and named for friends of the brewer, in this case, Nick & Simon. The plain brown bottle is only identified with a branded cap, and a hand written tag identifying the beer within.

Nick & Simon pours a cloudy amber, and the bubbly head disperses after a few pulls. I smelled the hops right away, and I taste them fully up front. There is a brightness through the middle I want to call citrus, but it’s pretty faint. There is a bit of a pine coating in the finish.

This drinks like a really comfortable IPA.

I would definitely drink this again, assuming Scott finds a way to get me another bottle.

Brouwerij ’t IJ Zatte

Brouwerij ’t IJ Zatte is a triple, clocking in at a very acceptable 8%. What can I say, I like effective beer. It pours a golden colour, with almost no head. I smelled citrus right off the bat, with a bit of hops behind it.

Once you get to drinking it, it’s dry but sweet. I tasted fruit, but also hops, yeast and spice. As with the previous beers I’ve had from Brouwerij’t IJ, it’s very complex, but impeccably balanced.

I thank Scott for the beer, and I would happily drink this again. Preferably with Scott. In the brewery.

 

Carolus

Here’s another one that I had earlier this summer on a hot day.
Carolus comes from the Het Anker brewery, a Flemish brewery originally founded in 1471. Anyway, blah blah blah, on to the beer.
It has strong alcohol in the nose, not surprising as it’s an 8.5% beer.
It pours out a bit cloudy with a dark brown color.
Strong caramel in the nose.
It has a spicy, molasses flavor and a slightly tart aftertaste.
This beer would be great at Christmas but not in the summer time. I would drink it again but it’s not remarkable.

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Brouwerij ’t IJ Columbus

Brouwerij ’t IJ hails from Amsterdam, and brews many types of beer. All of them are top fermented, and a few of them, including the Columbus, is 100% organic. If you ever get a chance to visit Amsterdam, you would do well to stop in at this brewery, not only for fine beer, but to view the impressive windmill that houses Brouwerij ’t IJ.

Columbus, aside from being 100% organic, hits your glass at 9%, pours golden and cloudy. I smell a bit of sourness and hops, as well as some spice. The flavour is complex, but it drinks much brighter than I expected based on the smell. I don’t taste much alcohol for the high percentage. There is a creaminess that balances the sourness of the hops.

I don’t think I could session this beer, but I’ll definitely drink it again whenever I get the chance!

Thanks again to Scott for the recommendation, the bottle of beer, and delivery!

Raftman

750ml bottle caged and corked.
5.5%
Smell: cloves, belgian yeast, soapy
Pour: copper amber with thick head of foam leaving lacing that lasted the entire glass
Taste: cloves, apple, acidic, carbonated, made with a smoked malt however I didn’t taste any smoke. A Belgian style ale. Not my favorite Unibroue beer but I would drink it again.

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Blanche de Chambly

I love the Sugarbowl. Love it. So many great beers. Sometimes I can’t remember which ones I’ve tried. So I decided to try them all. Not all at once but eventually. The easiest way is to start at the top of the list and work my way down! It’s a tough job but someone has to do it!

At the top of the beer list is Blanche de Chambly. It is a white beer from Unibroue in Chambly, Quebec. It’s nice and light at 5%. Has the banana and spice taste you’d expect from a witbier. I like it and would drink it again. In fact I will soon, I bought a 750ml bottle and will give it a shot!

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Weihenstephaner Hefe Weissbier

Weihenstephaner. The worlds oldest brewery. It started as a monastery brewery of the benedictine monks, and thankfully for all of us, it’s still brewing today as the Royal Bavarian State Brewery. I’ll cut the history lesson short.

If you like weiss bier, or wheat beer, you owe it to yourself to pick some of this up. Their class, not mass approach results in a very refreshing beer. As you might expect, it pours golden and cloudy. What sets it apart from other weiss bier for me is the incredible balance. You can probably smell or taste citrus, banana, cloves, wheat and some yeast. I also pick up a bit of coriander, as you’ll tasted in some other notable weiss bier. However, none of the others you’ll have tasted will balance it nearly as well as Weihenstephaner.

I will certainly be drinking this again, rather than my typical Hoegaarden.

Thanks for Scott for both the history lesson and the introduction to this great beer!